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Daily Archives: November 24, 2017

Waste and Want: A Social History of Trash : A Treasure based on Trash

Seems like the level of detail got to the point of saying the same thing, just worded differently.

Fantastic read about the social history of recycling. . This is a great book which i have lent to more people than other book i can remember. If you are big on recycling, you be fascinated by all of the stories about recycling.

Worth reading – and enlightening. . As a guy who works in the environmental field (i am a geologist) i found this book absolutely fascinating. It reveals things about life in the past that i could never have imagined. We just abandoned the practice after wwii and became a throw-away society.

Discusses with fascinating clarity what, on the surface, would appear to be a repellant subject. American history has a whole new meaning. This book answers the unspoken questions of ‘what did they do with. . ‘ in an orderly, systematic yet very interesting way. Who would have known garbage could be so riveting?well written, without technical jargon and extremely well organized. Strausser has turned a sow’s ear into a silk purse. Excellent discussion of the why and how of our detritus disposal through the ages right up through the hippie revival of the 70’s and the recycling exchange on the internet today. I can highly recommend this book to anyone with even a slight interest in the cycle and re-cycle of our castoffs.

I found parts of the book very interesting. The knowledge of how society has dealt with trash and garbage and how and why those approaches have changed over the years is useful to one’s thinking about the current problems we have with disposal. The book does a good job of informing the reader that ‘recycling’ is not at all a new concept and that, in fact, it was the standard for a long time up until the consumerism of the 20th century got us all on the ‘throw it away and buy new’ bandwagon. But there are parts of the book that need editing and throw which i found myself skimming — somewhat repetitive references to the important of the rag-trade or the over-long discussion of the development of women’s menstrual products. It felt like a lot of research that needed some editing.

Waste and Want: A Social History of Trash : This book is a history of household waste in the united states and what we have done with it over the years. Although strasser takes her research as far back as colonial times, most of the focus is on the habits of the nineteenth century, and how they evolved with our changing society. The first chapter introduces the central theme of the book, how in the past, especially before the turn of the twentieth century, waste products served as raw materials for other products. In other words, before we ever invented the word “recycling”, practically everything was recycled. Over the past 100 years, this has changed, so that now recycling seems like a new idea. Whereas in the past, cities and households constituted one component of a closed production/consumption system that included manufacturers, following the age of industrialization and mass production, that system has broken apart, and there is now a one-way flow from the factories to the consumers. And this flow leads eventually to mountains of garbage, for which we currently seem to have no better solution than mass burial. Strasser begins her story by describing an archeological dig of a 1620s settlement, where matching pieces of potshards were discovered at great distances from each other, suggesting that if a pot was broken, residents might have been in the habit of reusing the pieces for other purposes. Social history is notoriously hard to reconstruct, since people of the time rarely thought the details of their daily lives important enough to document.

Waste not, but now wanting almost results in it just to make room. The extent of research is impressive. And the presentation is expressive, not just factual. A great book that gives us a perspective of the past, and by juxtaposition, a penetratinglook at what the present means re. Our values and our environment.

Waste not, but now wanting almost results in it just to make room. The extent of research is impressive. And the presentation is expressive, not just factual. A great book that gives us a perspective of the past, and by juxtaposition, a penetratinglook at what the present means re. Our values and our environment.

I read this book for research because i wanted to know what people used to do with trash (or what we now call trash). If you’re interested in the answer, this is a good book to read. It discusses in detail what people used to do in the 1800’s (and before) with old clothing, food scraps, cooking fats, worn or broken items, etc. , and how and why that changed over time up until the present.

I read this book for research because i wanted to know what people used to do with trash (or what we now call trash). If you’re interested in the answer, this is a good book to read. It discusses in detail what people used to do in the 1800’s (and before) with old clothing, food scraps, cooking fats, worn or broken items, etc. , and how and why that changed over time up until the present.

Why we waste and what we can do about it. Anyone looking to understand why we waste in our current day and age need look no further than this exceptionally well researched and written social history of trash. Totally captivating to me who admittedly hates to waste, but i’m sure of interest to a broad swath of consumers who enjoy history and insights into our modern lifestyles. I garnered many insights for wehatetowaste. Com, a global community that i manage, about what worked in the past and why to incentivize people to reduce waste or to collect it for economic purposes, and how these same strategies might be updated for the future.

A really interesting read that explains how we got to where we are today with regards to our trash. It was fascinating to learn how industrialisation has changed how we relate to trash.

A really interesting read that explains how we got to where we are today with regards to our trash. It was fascinating to learn how industrialisation has changed how we relate to trash.

A book we should all read to bw able to grasp the impact we have on our world.

I found parts of the book very interesting. The knowledge of how society has dealt with trash and garbage and how and why those approaches have changed over the years is useful to one’s thinking about the current problems we have with disposal. The book does a good job of informing the reader that ‘recycling’ is not at all a new concept and that, in fact, it was the standard for a long time up until the consumerism of the 20th century got us all on the ‘throw it away and buy new’ bandwagon. But there are parts of the book that need editing and throw which i found myself skimming — somewhat repetitive references to the important of the rag-trade or the over-long discussion of the development of women’s menstrual products. It felt like a lot of research that needed some editing.

Fantastic read about the social history of recycling. . This is a great book which i have lent to more people than other book i can remember. If you are big on recycling, you be fascinated by all of the stories about recycling.

I liked the first chapter about reworking clothing to extend its life. It was fascinating to think of women doing all of this work by hand. Each chapter got longer and more bogged down with endless and repetitive details. Clearly the author did a massive amount of research, but why wasn’t it edited?. It wasn’t quite scholarly, but it had way too much dry factual information to be entertaining.

This book is a history of household waste in the united states and what we have done with it over the years. Although strasser takes her research as far back as colonial times, most of the focus is on the habits of the nineteenth century, and how they evolved with our changing society. The first chapter introduces the central theme of the book, how in the past, especially before the turn of the twentieth century, waste products served as raw materials for other products. In other words, before we ever invented the word ‘recycling’, practically everything was recycled. Over the past 100 years, this has changed, so that now recycling seems like a new idea. Whereas in the past, cities and households constituted one component of a closed production/consumption system that included manufacturers, following the age of industrialization and mass production, that system has broken apart, and there is now a one-way flow from the factories to the consumers. And this flow leads eventually to mountains of garbage, for which we currently seem to have no better solution than mass burial. Strasser begins her story by describing an archeological dig of a 1620s settlement, where matching pieces of potshards were discovered at great distances from each other, suggesting that if a pot was broken, residents might have been in the habit of reusing the pieces for other purposes. Social history is notoriously hard to reconstruct, since people of the time rarely thought the details of their daily lives important enough to document.

Worth reading – and enlightening. . As a guy who works in the environmental field (i am a geologist) i found this book absolutely fascinating. It reveals things about life in the past that i could never have imagined. We just abandoned the practice after wwii and became a throw-away society.

I liked the first chapter about reworking clothing to extend its life. It was fascinating to think of women doing all of this work by hand. Each chapter got longer and more bogged down with endless and repetitive details. Clearly the author did a massive amount of research, but why wasn’t it edited?. It wasn’t quite scholarly, but it had way too much dry factual information to be entertaining.

Why we waste and what we can do about it. Anyone looking to understand why we waste in our current day and age need look no further than this exceptionally well researched and written social history of trash. Totally captivating to me who admittedly hates to waste, but i’m sure of interest to a broad swath of consumers who enjoy history and insights into our modern lifestyles. I garnered many insights for wehatetowaste. Com, a global community that i manage, about what worked in the past and why to incentivize people to reduce waste or to collect it for economic purposes, and how these same strategies might be updated for the future.

A book we should all read to bw able to grasp the impact we have on our world.